Victorian service reshuffle: super-departments born


2013 Blackwoods Grand Final Breakfast

The new Victorian government’s bureaucratic reshuffle will bring power closer to the centre. But will it make departments too big to manage? The Mandarin has the details.

Incoming Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews’ (pictured) machinery of government changes have met with mixed responses from public servants.

The reforms have continued the centralisation of the Victorian government, paring back the number of departments from nine to seven from January 1. This follows a reduction from 11 departments enacted by the Coalition.

The new Special Minister of State, Gavin Jennings, will oversee government transparency, accountability, integrity and public sector administration and reform.

But some public servants have expressed concern that the ballooning of a few departments might make it difficult for secretaries to exercise effective control over their charges.

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  • Lea Corbett

    Despite the disappointing showing of women in the Victorian government’s departmental reshuffle (only 1 woman out of 7 department heads), I am somewhat buoyed by other recent news on the progress of women in leadership roles in governments and public services around Australia. I refer in particular to:
    – the 9 women among the 22 Ministerial appointments under the new Victorian government;
    – Stephen Easton’s report (The Mandarin, 02.12.14) on work underway to advance women in the NSW public service; and
    – the very promising work currently taking place inside the federal Treasury (of all places) known as the Progressing Women Initiative as reported by Gareth Hutchens in Business Day (The Age, 03.12.14).
    I sincerely hope the new Premier and his Special Minister of State appreciate the rich productivity rewards which will flow from the establishment of a true meritocracy in the Victorian public service and take action to significantly advance this agenda before the next reshuffle comes around.

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