Improving performance is not just about process, it’s what you do with it


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When it comes to practical ways of improving performance management, it’s not the process, but what you do with it that counts, according to ANZSOG’s Professor Deborah Blackman who has spent three years researching the APS’ record. Positivity, buy-in, and leadership support are all critical.

The latest push to reinvigorate performance management in the Australian Public Service won’t succeed without the buy-in of leaders and executive-level staff working to improve their people management skills.

To help middle managers get a handle on applying the principles of high performance management in the real world and within their existing processes, the Australia and New Zealand School of Government is running a popular workshop on the subject for the second time this May.

The host is one of Australia’s leading experts in the field, public sector management strategy professor Deborah Blackman, who led the Australian Public Service Commission’s three-year project, Strengthening the Performance Framework, and development of the related diagnostic tool for agencies.

Blackman says the workshop explores the reasoning behind the conclusions the research team reached for the APSC: that the focus must shift to encouraging high performance among all staff, instead of seeking out the small number of underperformers; and that performance management must become part of day-to-day, core business. The shift to high performance should also be linked to everything else that’s going on.

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