PM&C releases guide on how to finalise regulation impact statements

By Shannon Jenkins

September 26, 2019

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The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has issued new guidance on finalising and publishing a regulation impact statement.

According to the department website, “the publication of RISs and information about their adequacy is critical to transparency”.

“Transparency is one of the main purposes of regulatory impact analysis,” it reads.

Authored by the Office of Best Practice Regulation, the publication — which is basically a short guide to a long guide — explains how to meet the publication requirements of the RIS process. It is designed to be read alongside the 2014 Australian Government Guide to Regulation.

The guidance note outlines when and where a final RIS needs to be published, and whether it can be delayed. It also details situations where an RIS can be modified prior to publication, and whether it needs to be included in the explanatory memorandum or statement. 


READ MORE: New training videos from PM&C


According to the 2014 guide, every policy maker will at some point have to write a RIS, as every policy proposal designed to introduce or abolish regulation requires one. 

“The RIS is a tool designed to encourage rigour, innovation and better policy outcomes from the beginning,” it says.

“Even if you’re not the principal policy officer, you should use the RIS questions as a tool for analysing policy problems.”

The seven key RIS questions are:

  1. What is the problem you are trying to solve?
  2. Why is government action needed?
  3. What policy options are you considering?
  4. What is the likely net benefit of each option?
  5. Who will you consult about these options and how will you consult them?
  6. What is the best option from those you have considered?
  7. How will you implement and evaluate your chosen option?
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