More than 100 jobs to be cut from four Department of Defence offices

By Shannon Jenkins

Thursday August 27, 2020

Minister for Defence Linda Reynolds at a press conference after visiting a mission-critical data centre facility in Canberra, Wednesday, August 26, 2020. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas)

The Department of Defence will slash up to 111 jobs from its aerospace, intelligence and surveillance, and maritime and weapon divisions.

The Community and Public Sector Union on Thursday said 60 positions would be withdrawn from South Australia, Victoria would lose 44, and the remaining cuts would come from the New South Wales and the ACT offices.

It argued the cuts were a “direct result” of the federal government’s Average Staffing Level policy, with 4667 Defence jobs (21% of department staff) lost due to the staff cap since 2013.

The news has come a day after Scott Morrison promoted a $1 billion package which he said would support 4000 Defence jobs.


Read more: Government unveils $1b defence industry package


The union has called on the government to reverse its decision, according to CPSU deputy national president Brooke Muscat.

“The government needs to be investing in public sector jobs, not cutting them,” she said.

“These cuts will impact the capacity of the aerospace, intelligence and surveillance, and maritime and weapon divisions of the department. The Department of Defence and Australia’s defence capabilities should not be paying the price for political decisions.

“It’s time for the government to scrap the ASL cap and invest in the Australian public sector. If the past six months have shown us anything, it’s that the public sector is integral to Australia’s success and response to the pandemic.”

Last month it was revealed that the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade planned to slash 50 roles from Canberra, and 10 from overseas postings in Beijing, Jakarta, Manila, Tokyo, Mexico, Port Moresby, and Baghdad.


Read more: DFAT cuts to come from key regional posts


 

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