The race to rule Queensland is almost upon us. Here’s a primer for the bifurcated state

By Madonna King

Monday October 5, 2020

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and opposition leader Deb Frecklington (Images: AAP/Dan Peled)

October’s state election will mark the first time Queenslanders have been asked to determine who should govern since the state introduced set four-year terms. In a state of traditions, that will take time to bed in our psyche.

Another tradition up for grabs in this poll is that Queensland voters have, for most of the past 30 years, elected state Labor governments while giving the conservatives the federal seats they need to run the country.

This will be the 12th election since Queenslanders last had the chance to vote for the folk hero of conservative politics, Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen. They have only elected a conservative government, run by Campbell Newman, in one of them and it was sent packing in an electoral drubbing after just one term.

In that same period, voters have gone home strongly and sometimes overwhelmingly with John Howard, Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison at a federal level (the exception was the Rudd-slide in 2007).

October’s state election will mark the first time Queenslanders have been asked to determine who should govern since the state introduced set four-year terms. In a state of traditions, that will take time to bed in our psyche.

Another tradition up for grabs in this poll is that Queensland voters have, for most of the past 30 years, elected state Labor governments while giving the conservatives the federal seats they need to run the country.

This will be the 12th election since Queenslanders last had the chance to vote for the folk hero of conservative politics, Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen. They have only elected a conservative government, run by Campbell Newman, in one of them and it was sent packing in an electoral drubbing after just one term.

In that same period, voters have gone home strongly and sometimes overwhelmingly with John Howard, Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison at a federal level (the exception was the Rudd-slide in 2007).

This article is curated from our sister publication Crikey.

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