Obstacles for vaccine administration, say pharmacists

By Tom Ravlic

Tuesday September 7, 2021

Rules governing vaccine administration across three states pose obstacles to pharmacists' ability to administer Moderna to teens.
Rules governing vaccine administration across three states pose obstacles to pharmacists’ ability to administer Moderna to teens. (Minerva Studio/Adobe)

Rules governing vaccine administration in three states pose obstacles to the ability of pharmacists in those jurisdictions to administer the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to adolescents between the ages of 12 to 17 years, according to the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia.

The PSA says regulations and standards in Queensland, New South Wales, and Tasmania stand in the way pharmacists getting Moderna’s Spikevax into the arms of teenagers.

Chris Freeman, the national president of the pharmacists’ peak body, said states need to expedite changes to relevant laws or regulations to make the task of administering Spikevax easier.

The call for the three states to remove the regulatory hurdle for the administration of the vaccine follows the announcement by the Therapeutic Goods Administration over the weekend that the Spikevax had received provisional approval to be administered to younger Australians.

Other countries that have given either regulatory approval or authorisation for Spikevax to be administered to people aged between 12 and 17 years include the United Kingdom, European Union, Canada, and Switzerland.

The TGA has announced on August 9 that Spikevax had received provisional approval to be used as a vaccination for Australians aged 18 and older.

“Pharmacists have played a key role in the COVID-19 vaccine rollout to-date. With community pharmacists exclusively set to receive the first doses of Moderna around the country, it is crucial that they can administer the vaccine to individuals aged between 12 and 17 years from Day 1,” Freeman said.

“This is a race, and pharmacists, as one of our most accessible healthcare workforces, must continue to play a key role in vaccinating younger Australians.

“Pharmacists should be allowed to vaccinate with all TGA-approved vaccines in all practice settings.”


READ MORE:

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