All senators formally declared by AEC

By Anna Macdonald

June 22, 2022

senate-parliament-house
The new senators’ terms begin on July 1. (Image: Adobe/FiledIMAGE)

All the senators from the states have been formally declared by the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC), following the declaration of the senators from each of the two territories.

As a result of the election, there are 26 Labor senators, 32 Coalition senators, 12 Greens senators, and six senators on the crossbench. The terms of the newly elected senators begin on July 1. 

In Victoria, Labor’s Linda White and Jana Stewart have been elected to the senate. The Liberals’ Sarah Henderson, Nationals’ Bridget McKenzie, the Greens’ Lidia Thorpe, and United Australia Party’s Ralph Babet round out the rest of the senators.

For New South Wales, the senators are Labor’s Jenny McAllister and Deborah O’Neill, the Liberals’ Jim Molan and Marise Payne, the Greens’ David Shoebridge and the Nationals’ Ross Cadell.

The senators for Queensland are Liberal National Party of Queensland’s James McGrath and Matt Canavan, Labor’s Murray Watt and Anthony Chisholm, the Greens’ Penny Allman-Payne and One Nation’s Pauline Hanson.

The Liberals’ Simon Birmingham, Kerrynne Liddle and Andrew McLachlan, Labor’s Penny Wong and Don Farrell, and the Greens’ Barbara Pocock have been elected the senators for South Australia.

In the west, Labor’s Sue Lines, Glenn Sterle and Fatima Payman, the Liberals’ Michaelia Cash and Dean Smith and the Greens’ Dorinda Cox have been named senators for Western Australia.

Tasmania’s senators are Labor’s Anne Urquhart and Helen Polley, the Liberals’ Jonno Duniam and Wendy Askew, the Greens’ Peter Wish-Wilson, and the Jacquie Lambie Network’s Tammy Tyrrell. 

Each of the states’ respective Australian Electoral Officers said the counts have been open to scrutineers appointed by the candidates.  

Senate terms run for six years, whereas it’s three years in the house of representatives. Half of the senate seats go up for election during federal elections, alternating the half every three years. States are represented by 12 senators, whereas the two territories are represented by two apiece. 


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