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The power of government data on show: GovHack winners announced

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Open data will play a central role in the transformation of government services, says Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Addressing the GovHack 2015 red carpet awards via video, Turnbull reiterated the Commonwealth’s commitment to opening more data sets for public use.

“The most important part of GovHack is that its not just about a couple of days of fun — and a lot of coffee — it’s about the value and power of making government data public, and how real lasting commercial products of social value can be pulled together in prototype form in a short amount of time.

“We believe data collected by or for the public sector is a public good and we know making it open makes even greater benefits for the public.”

Turnbull’s own project, the Digital Transformation Office, was the lead government sponsor of GovHack this year.

Turnbull said he had great hopes for how DTO will be leveraging the prototypes and mash-ups from this year’s contributions.

What is GovHack?

GovHack is a weekend-long event in which teams of “hackers” create new uses from existing government data sets.

Now in its fifth year, GovHack has grown from a small events in 2009 to one that now spans multiple states and even across the Tasman with New Zealander teams taking part.

This year’s event — held in July — was its largest yet, with more than 1800 participants. Videos and final products of the 300 submitted projects are available online.

Awards were given to more than 25 teams, sponsored by the DTO, Telstra, Microsoft, Splunk, HP & Frame Group, Ancestry, IAG, Google, and many more.

Support also came from national agencies:

  • ABC
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)
  • Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC)
  • Australian Taxation Office (ATO)
  • CSIRO
  • Department of Communications
  • Department of Finance
  • Department of Industry and Science
  • Geoscience Australia
  • IP Australia
  • NSLA, State Libraries of NSW and National Archives of Australia
  • Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

Can I check out this data too?

 

GovHack by the numbers

  • 30 GovHack Events
  • 25 event in Australia,
  • 6 events in New Zealand
  • 6 GovHack youth events held for the first time in 2015: Adelaide(SA), Mount Gambier(SA), Playford (SA), Onkaparinga (SA), Melbourne (Vic),  Auckland (New Zealand)
  • The youngest competitor was eight and competed in a father-son team (Adelaide)
  • Total prize value in excess of $300,000 across local, national and international prizes
  • 2000 participants
  • 400 Teams formed
  • 300 new concepts and prototypes submitted
  • Participation by federal, state and local governments with over 600 new datasets released openly on government data portal in time for the competition.

Submitted projects by state

  • 17 from Western Australia
  • 19 from Tasmania
  • 28 from ACT
  • 32 from New Zealand
  • 42 from New South Wales
  • 48 from Queensland
  • 52 from South Australia
  • 62 from Victoria

The winners

The international categories were open to both Australian and New Zealand teams. The remaining hack and bounty awards were for Australian teams.

 

The International Best Disaster Mitigation Hack

iHelp by team Tremorz in New Zealand

 

The International Digital Humanities Hack

patentstori.es by team Patent Trolls in Canberra

 

International Bounty for Best WWI Hacks

ANZhACks by team Hackasaurus Wrecks in Canberra; and

Citizen Culture and Heritage: Lest we Forget by team Technogesic in Ballarat

 

The Best Digital Transformation Hack

Health Buddy by team Chamonix in Adelaide

 

The Best Open Government Data Hack

Question Time: A game of policy by Team Executive Swivel in Tasmania

 

The Best Science Hack

Lungs by team Saint Simon in Adelaide

 

The Best Policy Insights Hack

Synergising Synergies for Sitizens by team Synergising Synergies for Sitizens in Perth

 

The Best Data Journalism Hack

Mapping Pedestrian Activities & Safety in Melbourne by team Monash City Science in Melbourne

 

The Best Entrepreneurial Hack

Neuron – Connecting Like Minds by team Neuron in Sydney

 

The Best Youth Team (18 years and under)

AusEd by team Nexus_Is_Back in Mount Gambier South Australia

 

Best Higher Education Team

patentstori.es by team Patent Trolls in Canberra

 

Best Public Servant Team

Safeway-2-go by team Hippo Creative in Adelaide

 

Best Professional Team

Our Local Stories by team Our Local Stories in Melbourne

 

The most useful Product or Service for the Public Bounty

Industry Check: Is it time to move on by team Elephant in Canberra

 

The ABC regional bounty

Secret Suburb by team BigDataBigDream in Sydney

 

The Statistics data bounty

AboutOz by team Caffeinate me in Perth

 

The Charity data bounty

Charitable Mapping by team Sleepless in Sydney in Sydney

 

The Taxation data bounty

The Glass Ceiling Index by team Blackwattle in Sydney

 

The Scientific data bounty

Twitter Field Guide by team FieldGuidesInc in Canberra

 

The National Map bounty

Use Your Words by team 66& Teague in Canberra

 

The Structure of government bounty

Struct by team GD in Toowoomba

 

The Air conditioner and energy bounty

Air Compare by team Patch in Canberra

 

The Geoscience Australia data bounty

Minecraft your city by team Mind the App in Canberra

 

The Intellectual Property data bounty

Neuron – Connecting Like Minds by team Neuron in Sydney

 

The Health and welfare bounty

Death and Taxes by team Hackasaurus Wrecks in Canberra

 

The Open Source bounty

SynergyCity by team SynergyCity in Perth

 

The Indigenous issues bounty

#oncounty by team #oncountry in Perth

 

The Hacker Vote Award  – voted by competitors

Crime Sheep by team Sandpit Ninjas in New Zealand

Author Bio

Harley Dennett

Harley Dennett is editor at The Mandarin based in Canberra. He's held communications roles in the New South Wales public sector and Defence, and been a staff reporter for newspapers in Sydney and Washington DC.