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Are we wise enough (smart enough) to survive our own success? If so, how can we all get along better? Practicing tolerance in the Age of Stupid
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Are we wise enough (smart enough) to survive our own success? If so, how can we all get along better? Practicing tolerance in the Age of Stupid

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I have striven not to laugh at human actions, not to weep at them, not to hate them, but to understand them — Baruch Spinoza, Tractatus Politicus, 1676 The burden of unbounded knowledge weighs heavily on those with open minds. Those trapped within a specific moral code express righteous indignation that their beliefs should be […]

Miriam Vogel delivered implicit bias training for Obama. Now she guides AI developers: ‘Many more lives are impacted by the bias of that black box’
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Miriam Vogel delivered implicit bias training for Obama. Now she guides AI developers: ‘Many more lives are impacted by the bias of that black box’

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Miriam Vogel developed and led implicit bias training for federal law enforcement while at the United States Department of Justice. Tackling defensiveness is an important part of successful implicit bias training, she says. It’s really helpful to start by defusing that defensiveness and making it clear that this is a human condition, it doesn’t make you an evil person, it makes us human.

An ableist public service? How to shift the underemployment of people with disability in the Australian Public Sector

An ableist public service? How to shift the underemployment of people with disability in the Australian Public Sector

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Data from the Australian Public Sector Database shows a steady long-term decline in the number and proportion of people with disability in the Commonwealth public sector. One APS narrative is that the problem is not as big as it seems — non-disclosure of disability is more of a problem than a lack of representation. It becomes too easy to use such statements as a means of shifting responsibility for failures in public sector disability employment policy, writes Paul Williamson.

Westpac ticking every anti-money-laundering box wouldn’t make much difference to criminals

Westpac ticking every anti-money-laundering box wouldn’t make much difference to criminals

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The charges surrounding Westpac’s alleged 23 million breaches of anti-money laundering laws have been called “about as serious as it gets”. Westpac shirking its reporting responsibilities is bad, obviously. But the context is also important. Consider the sheer number of reports banks are expected to file automatically with the number of reports involving suspicious transactions, and the number leading to actual arrests and convictions.

David Kalisch needed to transform ABS’s leadership, strategy and delivery. How the organisation learned to continuously improve and maintain focus in a maelstrom of misunderstandings
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David Kalisch needed to transform ABS’s leadership, strategy and delivery. How the organisation learned to continuously improve and maintain focus in a maelstrom of misunderstandings

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I had never experienced anything like the media, social media and political response to the 2016 Census, until it happened. You need to maintain perspective, integrity and authenticity while the maelstrom is at its peak, as this helps the organisation keep its focus and ballast.

Australian bipartisanship on climate change: the long haul

Australian bipartisanship on climate change: the long haul

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In Australia's history of climate change policy, there's been a few well-placed spoilers, backed by vested interests, who have thrown stones and kept good policy off the table. But there is a growing wave of public support for action. And at the end of the day, all pollies need that support to get re-elected. Scott Hamilton and Stuart Kells provide a timeline of Australia's acknowledgement of climate change.